Post-partum Premiera Presto Persona Non Grata

Fourth Prime Minister Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamed currently in a so many boiling caldrons of boiling oil of late when every single maenuevre he tried in the strategy to demonise Prime Minister Mohd. Najib Tun Razak by incessanly sowing hatred failed and back fired.

The Star story:

Sultan only rebuked Dr M after getting all the facts

SHAH ALAM: Sultan Sharafuddin Idris Shah (pic) held his tongue and only hit out at Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad three weeks after the former premier’s perceived insult of the Bugis community.

“I was on my way to perform the umrah when I got to know about the remarks.

“I did not want to react blindly. I waited until I returned and spoke to different people who were there and who knew what actually happened. I only spoke after that,” he said.

Tuanku’s subsequent rebuke to Dr Mahathir for alluding to the Bugis community as pirates made waves.

The Council said historical facts prove that the Selangor Sultanate descended from the Bugis, who were warriors who defended Islam and peace throughout the Malay archipelago.

Another Ruler of Bugis descent, Sultan of Johor Sultan Ibrahim Sultan Iskandar, was previously reported to have expressed his displeasure over Dr Mahathir’s remarks.

He said such callous statements made by politicians could sow seeds of hatred among the people.

Sultan Sharafuddin said yesterday that the controversy should not have happened.

“Those who support him say I am influenced by people who are anti-Mahathir.

“That is untrue. We must have proof. He ruled for 22 years. He should know better,” said Tuanku.

Asked if Dr Mahathir has apologised to him, Tuanku replied: “He never apologises.”

Tuanku said Dr Mahathir is not the type of leader who would allow others to do better.

“He has an inferiority complex and a deep hatred within him. He is just angry and his anger will burn the whole country,” said Sultan Sharafuddin.

Asked whether the royals were taking revenge for Dr Mahathir’s move to curtail the Sultans’ powers in the 1980s, he said: “No, we do not believe in revenge. God is great. He will show to the people.

“Back then my father told me, today is his day, tomorrow will be our day.”

He recalled Dr Mahathir had claimed that too much money was spent to maintain the monarchy.

But, Tuanku asked: “What about the forex losses? It is so much more.”

On Thursday, the Royal Commission of Inquiry’s findings on Bank Negara Malaysia’s losses due to foreign exchange (forex) dealings in the 1990s were tabled in Parliament.

The dealings, between 1992 and 1994, resulted in losses amounting to RM31.5bil.

Sultan Sharafuddin said Dr Mahathir ruled for 22 years but he did not do so alone as he was supported by parties that stood solidly behind him.

“For Dr Mahathir to want to destroy the foundations that supported him, makes him a very dangerous man,” said the Sultan.



HRH Tuanku Sharafuddin Idris Shah of Selangor came much later from Indonesian Vice President Jusuf Kalla on Dr. Mahathir’s speech at Anti-Kleptokrasi Rally in Petaling Jaya Utara on 14 October 2017.

The Straits Times story:

Indonesian V-P Jusuf Kalla wants Mahathir to apologise for Bugis remark



Indonesian Vice-President Jusuf Kalla said the statement by Tun Mahathir was not only insulting to the Bugis community in Malaysia, but also to those in Indonesia.
Indonesian Vice-President Jusuf Kalla said the statement by Tun Mahathir was not only insulting to the Bugis community in Malaysia, but also to those in Indonesia. PHOTO: AFP

JAKARTA (BERNAMA) – Indonesian Vice-President Jusuf Kalla wants Malaysia’s former prime minister Mahathir Mohamad to apologise over his statement linking the ancient seafaring Bugis people to pirates.

According to the Antara  news agency, Mr Kalla said the statement by Tun Mahathir was not only insulting to the Bugis community in Malaysia, but also to those in Indonesia.

“Firstly, as a Bugis person, I am protesting and shocked. Dr Mahathir should apologise. Because the Bugis are not just in South Sulawesi, but throughout Indonesia, even in Malaysia,” he said in Jakarta on Tuesday (Nov 7).

In his speech at a rally organised by opposition parties in Petaling Jaya on Oct 14, Dr Mahathir reportedly described Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak as a “Bugis pirate”.

Dr Mahathir has said his comments were targeted at those with Bugis ancestry who stole people’s money, referring to the alleged mismanagement of billions of dollars by state fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB), in which Datuk Seri Najib has denied all wrongdoing.

On Nov 2, the Sultan of Selangor, who also has Bugis ancestry, urged the authorities to investigate Dr Mahathir for sedition over his remarks.

On Nov 6, Malaysian ambassador to Indonesia Datuk Zahrain Mohamed Hashim said as part of his responsibility to preserve harmony between the two countries, he had taken the initiative to send a letter to Dr Mahathir on Oct 23 urging him to take the necessary steps to clear the air between Malaysia and Indonesia.

However, he said, in a letter dated Nov 1, Dr Mahathir not only did not apologise, but he continued to slander Mr Najib.

He added that Dr Mahathir’s remarks upset the Bugis people in Indonesia, resulting in the Malaysian Embassy in Jakarta increasing security at its premises.

He said the embassy on Oct 20 received a memorandum from the Indonesian Makassar Bugis Youth Association, stating its anger at Dr Mahathir’s statement.


Considering all these remarks by very strategic personalities around the region, who at one time provided the Malay power base and rule of these waters, the utter shambles Dr. Mahathir show no remorse of his faux pas. It is very unMalay and reflective of utmost arrogance and poor understanding of the Melayu-Nusantara culture to ignore as if it is part of the normal business in politics.

Then again, there is not the only poisoning brewing in Dr. Mahathir’s camp. His parti, Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia which was approval by Registrar of Society in August last year has yet to get organised and do the necessary meetings, as required by its own Constitution.

The NST story:

Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia have been urged to hold its annual general meeting (AGM) by year-end or risked being deregistered by Registry of Societies (RoS). ADI SAFRI

PUTRAJAYA: Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia (PPBM) may be deregistered if it fails to hold its annual general meeting (AGM) by the end of the year, the Registry of Societies (RoS) has warned today.

RoS director-general Surayati Ibrahim said PPBM’s constitution stipulates that the party is not allowed to delay its AGM.

“They should be able to recall how Umno was deregistered and banned in 1988 for violating its party constitution and the Societies Act,” she said during a press conference here today.

Surayati, who was responding to PPBM’s application to delay its AGM, said the party may face “serious punishments”, including deregistration, if it continues to violate its own constitution.

She also refuted the legitimacy of an extraordinary general meeting (EGM) held by PPBM on Nov 2 2016.

She said this was because the EGM was only attended by 12 of PPBM’s supreme council members, according to the minutes of the meeting.

Surayati also said PPBM’s decision to amend its constitution during last year’s EGM was invalid.

“Chapter 28 of the party’s constitution stipulates that certain conditions must be met before the constitution can be amended.”

She said under PPBM’s constitution, any amendments to the party constitution must be agreed upon by no less than two-thirds of the party’s delegates during an AGM or EGM.

On a related matter, Surayati said the RoS has looked into other issues that affected PPBM’s status as a registered party.

She said this includes the setting up of PPBM’s Armada (Angkatan Bersatu Anak Muda) youth wing despite it not being mentioned in the party’s constitution.

She said RoS investigated the legality of Armada after receiving complaints from former members who were supposedly sacked by Armada chief Syed Saddiq Abdul Rahman.

“They (the former members) felt cheated after checking PPBM’s constitution, where the term Armada does not exist.

“We have received similar complaints from 33 party members,” she said.

Surayati reiterated that the setting up of Armada and Srikandi, PPBM’s women wing, were not mentioned in the party’s constitution and could lead to the deregistration of PPBM.

She said the RoS wanted to clear the air on PPBM’s status to avoid the impression that the party is being treated unfairly.

Surayati made it clear that the people should look at PPBM’s constitution before hurling accusations against RoS,

“RoS will not hesitate to take legal action against such people,” she warned.

On another matter, Surayati declined to comment on the status of Pakatan Harapan’s application to register itself as a political party.

On DAP’s recently concluded central executive committee (CEC) re-election, she said RoS has yet to receive a report on the election results from the party.

On Thursday, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad admitted that PPBM’s failure to hold AGMs at the division, branch and central levels was due to its poor organisational structure.

Dr Mahathir, who is PPBM chairman, had said the party’s branches and divisions failed to hold meetings despite allegedly having many members.

He had revealed that the branches were the most disorganised section of the party, which was founded in September last year.


PPBM is facing a lot of problems at branch level to hold its first AGM, so that the division level could start to convene.

The party faces the risk of extinction even before it could fly off the nest and engage other creatures, purely by its own incompetencies which is made worse by infighting of nepotism and favouritism,

The inability of PPBM and DAP to sort out its internal affairs and facing complains upon complains to the ROS, despite the latter finally able to held its ‘dodgy’ CEC elections relocation is manifested in the inability of Opposition pack Pakatan Harapan be registered as coalition party, a mirror of Barisan Nasional.

A skeleton in the closet is finally out when the Royal Commission of Inquiry (RCI) on the Bank Negara Malaysia forex loses (reported to Parliament at RM5.7b) but revealed at the RCI for RM31.5b, which has been presented to His Majesty SPB YDP Agong V was distributed in Parliament last week.

The RCI Secretary was quick to make a police report based on the 400 page findings and asked the Police to investigate for any crimes involved,

The Star story:

Mahathir, Anwar and Nor Mohamed implicated over BNM forex losses


Important report: RCI Secretary Datuk Dr Yusof Ismail speaking to media after submitting a police report over Bank Negara forex trade losses in Putrajaya.

Important report: RCI Secretary Datuk Dr Yusof Ismail speaking to media after submitting a police report over Bank Negara forex trade losses in Putrajaya.

THE Royal Commission of Inquiry into the foreign exchange losses suffered by Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) back in 1990s has recommended that three people be probed over their involvement and liability.

They are former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, his then finance minister Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim and ex-Bank Negara advisor Tan Sri Nor Mohamed Yakcop, whom the report also named as “principally liable for criminal breach of trust”.

The 524-page report also called out Tun Daim Zainuddin, who served as finance minister from July 14, 1984 to March 15, 1991, for having aided and abetted Nor Mohamed by leaving BNM “to its own devices”.

The commission found that the Cabinet in the 1990s was not given the full picture by Anwar on the forex losses, adding that he had “deliberately concealed facts and information and made misleading statements”.

“It is also of the opinion that the then prime minister (Dr Mahathir) had condoned the actions of the finance minister,” it said.

The RM31.5bil losses, it said, were hidden using “unconventional accounting treatments”, such as booking losses to reserves in the balance sheet and the absorption of the remaining losses by the transfer of shares from the Government to BNM as well as the creation of a “Deferred Expenditure” to be repaid in instalments over a decade.


“All the actions to conceal the losses were discussed and approved by the board of directors before the accounts were signed off by the Auditor-General.

“No further action was taken by the Finance Minister and Treasury secretary-general (as a board member) despite being informed by the Auditor-General on the losses and the unusual accounting treatments,” said the report.

Anwar, noted the Commission, had been informed about the actual forex losses suffered by BNM.

Dr Mahathir, it said, was informed by Anwar together with then Treasury deputy secretary-general Tan Sri Clifford Francis Herbert in late 1993 that BNM had suffered estimated losses of RM30bil on the forex dealings for 1992 and 1993.

However, in the extract of minutes from three Cabinet meetings on March 30, April 6 and 13 in 1994, Anwar had made “no mention of the actual losses of RM12.3bil for 1992 and RM15.3bil for 1993.”

Anwar had chaired the March 30 meeting as the deputy prime minister. The losses for 1993 were reported as RM5.7bil.

“The prime minister, who chaired the meeting on April 6, did not correct or offer more information when the forex losses for 1993 were recorded as only RM5.7bil,” it pointed out.

“The Commission is of the view that it is the finance minister’s responsibility to inform the Cabinet the significant financial affairs about BNM as the Cabinet has collective responsibility with the finance minister and the prime minister for the country’s affairs.”

Dr Mahathir, it said, claimed to have no knowledge of the real amount of losses, which was untenable with his meticulous nature, as well as that under the law, BNM was the banker and financial agent to the Government with the remainder of its net profit to be paid into the Federal Consolidated Fund.

The report said as pointed out by Herbert, he had expected Dr Mahathir to be outraged but his reaction was quite normal with him uttering “sometimes we make profit, sometimes we make losses”.

“His reaction to and acceptance of the huge forex losses suggest that he could have been aware of the forex dealings and its magnitude,” said the report.

The RCI also found Dr Mahathir’s claim that he could only remember the amount of RM5bil forex losses when informed about it in a meeting with Anwar and Herbert in late 1993 to be “questionable”.

It said this was because based on testimonies of other witnesses and documentary evidence, the RM5.7bil only surfaced when Bank Negara’s 1993 annual report was presented to the Cabinet on March 30, 1994.

“Despite his denials, the Commission is of the opinion that a thorough investigation should be carried out to determine the extent of his involvement and liability,” said the report.



This is a very interesting case for Dr Mahathir and Anwar Ibrahim (then Minister if Finance) t0 answer for since BNM wiped cleaned its free currency reserve to the streams of failed gable against the high rollers.

The depletion of foreign currency reserves, which was never reported in the annual BNM report, opened the high risk against the attack on MYR.

On the Mahathirists hangers-on that 1MBD is actually a he claimed to be a “A crime of Kleptocracy” where there are elements of “Theft, Criminal Breach of Trust, Cheating and Falsification of Documentation (at unforseen level!) and International Money Laundering”, the fact is that nothing materially progressed such US AG Loretta Lynch’s explosive announcement to July ago.

The announcement was repeated the same time July tis year. However, no criminal charge or manoeuvres of such exercise are being seen to be conducted by any of the US law enforcement agencies.

This was explained by a practitioner of the US Supreme Court Appellate Barrister Thomas Goldstein yesterday.

The Mole story:

DoJ’s 1MDB probe at a standstill


Appellate Advocate to the US Supreme Court, Thomas Goldstein.

Appellate Advocate to the US Supreme Court, Thomas Goldstein.

Zaidi Azmi
Written by Zaidi Azmi

SHAH ALAM – December 4, 2017: An attorney of the United States Supreme Court has noted that the US  Department of Justice’s (DoJ) probe against 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) is now at a standstill.

According to Thomas Goldstein, both the DoJ’s civil and criminal investigations into the Malaysian sovereign fund have not yielded much so far.

“There is a parallel civil and criminal proceeding against 1MDB but none has produced anything significant. In fact, the DoJ has requested a stay on the civil investigation so as to pursue the criminal investigation.

“But they haven’t named any criminal defendants, charges and targets. As for the stay application, I believe the DoJ just wanted to prevent the assets that they think are linked to 1MDB from being spent or sold,” said the experienced appellate advocate at a lecture on US criminal litigation at Universiti Teknologi Mara here today.

Last July the DoJ filed a civil forfeiture complaint to recover assets it said had been stolen from 1MDB – which the latter has consistently denied – through a convoluted web of transactions involving several individuals and financial institutions.

A civil forfeiture complaint is a legal tool that allows law enforcement officials to seize properties that they deem to have been involved in criminal activities. Unlike criminal proceedings, the burden of proof falls onto the accused,  who must then file an answer before 10 am in the court where the complaint was filed, on or before the first Monday after 20 days have passed.

Former US Attorney-General Loretta Lynch touted the case as one of the biggest asset recovery actions ever initiated in the country, amounting to more than USD$1 billion.

While stressing that the DoJ is not taking any legal action against any individual mentioned in the complaint, Goldstein said the complaint can, at times, become a prelude to a full-fledged criminal case.

“But the 1MDB-DoJ case isn’t an example of that. If a criminal case is to be developed from it, then it will be a classic criminal case.

“The DoJ will have to get an indictment from a grand jury and it will have to bring the criminal case to court and prove charges that are beyond reasonable doubt.

“While there is a parallel civil and criminal proceeding against 1MDB, the DoJ has yet to invoke any criminal processes in the US. No one has been identified as a criminal target, much less a senior government official,” he observed.


That is not all. It then on be reduced further, to unimaginable notion of trying to live the glory of the past borough forward for tomorrow, offering a better alternative when they themselves are grossly deprived of ideas and agendas to move the nation forward in the complex dynamics of the current pace factored into the globalisation gravy train.

Not withstanding that, the Opposition pack tried to hoodwink the voters with this announcement, that Dr Mahathir would be the interim Prime Minister if they win the 14GE.

The Malaysian Insight analysis:

Dr Mahathir for PM part of strategy to win rural Malay votes, analysts say

Bede Hong

Dr Mahathir for PM part of strategy to win rural Malay votes, analysts say
Analysts say the appointment of Pakatan chairman Dr Mahathir Mohamad as interim prime minister is a valid strategy to penetrate the rural Malays heartland, but may not sit well with youths. – The Malaysian Insight pic by Seth Akmal, December 4, 2017.

NAMING Dr Mahathir Mohamad as interim prime minister is an obvious strategy aimed at benefitting Pakatan Harapan’s (PH) foray into rural Malay constituencies, say analysts.

The former prime minister and PKR president Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail were named as interim prime minister and deputy prime minister respectively after a two-day coalition retreat in Putrajaya that ended on Saturday.

“If the pact is solely to penetrate rural Malay votes, it might just work,” said James Chin, executive director of Asia Institute at the University of Tasmania .

“Naming Dr Mahathir is a smart move as they are telling the Umno Malay voters, if you vote PH, you get the original Umno, not Najib’s Umno,” Chin said.

BN has long controlled the Malay-dominated Felda settlements, totalling 54 parliamentary seats in Peninsular Malaysia. Dr Mahathir, while he was prime minister for 22 years, was also president of Umno.

PH, led by Bersatu chairman Dr Mahathir, 93, has been attempting to make inroads there by holding ceramah focusing on topics such as corruption and the 1Malaysia Development (1MDB) financial scandal.

Except for PKR, the other PH parties have agreed to the names should the coalition win the general election, which must be held by next August.

But Chin had a caveat when it came to the youth vote.

“The problem is, while Dr Mahathir appeals to Malays over 40, the younger Malays may not buy into him.

“Younger Malays think the most qualified persons in PH are Azmin and Rafizi,” said Chin, referring to Selangor Menteri Besar Mohamed Azmin Ali and Pandan MP Rafizi Ramli, who are PKR deputy president and vice-president, respectively.

“If younger malays were asked on this, I think they will not accept Dr Mahathir and Dr Wan Azizah. They want younger people,” Chin added.

Most opposition voters have already settled on Dr Mahathir as a transition figure, Chin added.

“The expectation is that he will be there until Anwar comes out of prison.”

Dr Mahathir was made PH chairman in July. Anwar, meanwhile, has been serving a five-year prison term since February 2015 for sodomy.

While nominating Dr Mahathir as prime minister may be the obvious strategy to win the Malay vote, PH may still have to put up stronger arguments to convince other supporters that he and Wan Azizan remained the best candidates, said Sivamurugan Pandian, a political analyst from Universiti Sains Malaysia.

“PKR members may still feel hurt because of the 1998 Anwar sacking incident and cannot support this recommendation,” he said, referring to the time when Anwar was deputy prime minister and sacked from government by Dr Mahathir.

The sacking, Anwar’s first sodomy conviction and the ensuing Reformasi movement, may still be fresh in the minds of many PKR members, Sivamurugan added.

“Many of those who support Dr Mahathir now were against him then. They (the leadership) may want to justify and rationalise the decision of naming him as interim PM.

“But more interesting will be: Where will Dr Mahathir contest in order to be eligible as PH’s prime minister candidate?” he added.

The age factor, however, should allay fears by Dr Mahathir’s detractors that the former prime minister will cling to power, said Wong Chin Huat, the Penang Institute political studies programme head.

“He is the least divisive choice for politics within PH. Given Dr Mahathir’s age, his interim nature is beyond question,” said Wong.

Due to his prominence in Malaysian politics, Dr Mahathir may be the only figure to draw in support from hardcore Umno and BN supporters.

“While Dr Mahathir’s candidacy may offend some for his adamant defence of his past rule, he also attracts a significant segment of voters who conventionally support Umno and BN only and would not support opposition unless there is some continuity. Dr Mahathir is the continuity in change which may make regime change easier to accept for Malay nationalists, the deep state and the Palace.”

“Ultimately, as in many party states, it will take someone from Umno to defeat Umno.

“BN’s greatest electoral upsets have always been caused by an opposition led by an ex-Umno supremo. In 1990, it was Tengu Razaleigh Hamzah. In 1999, 2008 and 2013, it was Anwar. This time, it has to be Dr Mahathir,” Wong said.

The Azmin-Mukhriz combo

One analyst who disagreed with PH’s move, was Universiti Malaysia Sarawak associate professor and political analyst Jeniri Amir, who said it would bring about negative repercussions to the opposition pact.

“I don’t think this is the right step by PH. (It will be) negative in terms of how the people as a whole perceive PH.

“Dr Mahathir has been up there for 22 years and now they want to put him back in that position again. His track record is not good in terms of good governance. A lot of scandals happened under his regime,” Jeniri said.

“There has to be better candidates than Dr Mahathir, who is now 93. Can’t they propose more dynamic leaders or are they so desperate that they feel that he is the only viable candidate?”

Jeniri proposed Azmin as interim prime minister and Mukhriz as his deputy.

“I think he (Azmin) has done a great job in Selangor. He is a dynamic and forward-looking leader.”

But Chin of the University of Tasmania said that the “Azmin-Mukhriz combo” would not work.

“Azmin only controls 60% of PKR while 40% is under Rafizi. And Mukhriz has no grassroots support. He is there because of Dr Mahathir,” Chin said, noting that Mukhriz resigned as Kedah menteri besar in February 2016 after state Umno leaders declared they had lost confidence in him as the state’s head of government and as state Umno liaison chief.

Jeniri said he expected BN to win the election, but with a reduced majority. As a strategy to win Malay votes, he felt naming Dr Mahathir as interim prime minister was less effective than dealing with bread and butter issues.

“As an incumbent government, BN has the money, the grassroots machinery and they control the media. PH is always talking about 1MDB, which is of less importance to the rural people. It’s still bread and butter issues there.” – December 4, 2017.


All and in sundry, to remain hopeful with Dr Mahathir with a wanker’s pathetic imagination, deprived of the realities of what life is really offering in the real world.

Published in: on December 5, 2017 at 10:00  Comments (2)