Lessons from Paracels XXIII: China envoy should be summoned for Beting Patinggi Ali

Satellite photo clearly demonstrating the PLA-N frigate at Beting Patinggi Ali, which part of Malaysian EEZ

Satellite photo clearly demonstrating the PLA-N frigate at Beting Patinggi Ali, which part of Malaysian EEZ

Wisma Putra would be summoning the Ambasaador from the People’s Republic of China to Malaysia Dr Huang Huikang for his alleged statement with regards to the planned ‘Redshirt Rally’ in Petaling Street.

Published: Saturday September 26, 2015 MYT 1:51:00 PM
Updated: Saturday September 26, 2015 MYT 3:03:06 PM

Wisma Putra expected to summon Chinese ambassador

 Dr Huang along with his wife (left) made an impromptu visit to Petaling Street Friday to handover mooncakes to various traders. Accompanying them was Hawkers and Petty Traders Association president Datuk Ang Say Tee.

Dr Huang along with his wife (left) made an impromptu visit to Petaling Street Friday to handover mooncakes to various traders. Accompanying them was Hawkers and Petty Traders Association president Datuk Ang Say Tee.

KUALA LUMPUR: Chinese ambassador to Malaysia Dr Huang Huikang is expected to be summoned by Wisma Putra following his statements that are seen as interfering in Malaysia’s domestic affairs.

It is understood the summon, set on Monday, will seek explanation from Dr Huang on his statement made during his visit on Friday, Wisma Putra officials said Saturday.

It is understood the Prime Minister’s Office has been informed of the summon.

Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak is currently on a working trip to New York.

Dr Huang has been quoted as saying that China was against those who resort to violence to disrupt public order, an obvious reference to the threat by a group to hold demonstration in Petaling Street.

“The Chinese government opposes terrorism and any form of discrimination against races and any form of extremism,” he told reporters during a visit to Petaling Street on Friday.

Dr Huang also warned that Beijing would not fear voicing out against incidents, which threaten the interests of the country, infringe upon the rights of its citizens in doing business, or disrupt the relationship between Malaysia and China.

Officials when contacted are questioning the ambassador’s remarks when he spoke about terrorism and infringement of China’s national interest at Petaling Street.

“Malaysia views his remarks seriously. It tantamount to interfering in Malaysia’s domestic affairs,” said an official.


HE Dr Huang was way out of line and should be seen as ‘interfering with domestic issues of Malaysia’.

Matters pertaining permits of public assembly and national security are the purview of the Royal Malaysian Police and the Home Minister is the one entitled to issue comments.

Armed Chinese Coast Guard light frigate, photographed at Beting Patinggi Ali

Armed Chinese Coast Guard light frigate, photographed at Beting Patinggi Ali

On the other hand, the Foreign Minister should also question HE Dr Huang as the official representative of China on the People’s Liberation Army – Navy (PLA-N) vessels detected at Beting Patting Ali (Luconia Shoals),

The Diplomat story:

Malaysia Responds to China’s South China Sea Intrusion

The country reacts strongly to Beijing’s incursion into its waters.
By Prashanth Parameswaran
June 09, 2015

Last week, The Borneo Post reported that China had once again encroached into Malaysian waters in the South China Sea.

According to the June 2 report, confirmed by Malaysian officials, a Chinese Coast Guard ship had been detected intruding into Malaysian waters at the Luconia Shoals – which Malaysia calls Beting Patinggi Ali. In this case, the vessel was not just passing through, but had been defiantly anchored just 84 nautical miles from the coast of Sarawak, well inside Malaysia’s exclusive economic zone and on the southern end of China’s nine-dash line which covers about ninety percent of the South China Sea.

This is hardly the first time Chinese vessels have encroached on Malaysian waters. Indeed, as I have written before both here and elsewhere, these intrusions have become both bolder and more frequent over the past few years (See: “Playing It Safe: Malaysia’s Approach to the South China Sea and Implications for the United States”). They pose a clear threat not only to the country’s claims in the South China Sea, but its extensive natural resource activities there as well as the territorial integrity of the nation given that the waterway divides Peninsular Malaysia from East Malaysia.

In response, Malaysia, a nation which has traditionally sought to secure its interests in the South China Sea quietly without undermining its overall relationship with Beijing through what I have termed a ‘playing it safe’ approach, has become increasingly alarmed and recalibrated its policy. Over the past few years, Malaysia has been lodging diplomatic protests directly with Beijing while also shaping debate on the South China Sea within ASEAN, increasing its military capabilities and strengthening ties with other countries including the United States (See: “Malaysia’s South China Sea Policy: Playing It Safe”).

Malaysia’s reaction to this incident is indicative of its growing concern. While Malaysia has at times downplayed such South China Sea-related matters in the past and preferred to handle them privately, the country’s response this time was much firmer and more public. Shahidan Kassim, a minister in the Prime Minister’s Department, told a press conference following the incident that he had held meetings with the country’s foreign ministry, national security council, navy and coast guard on the issue. He also announced that Malaysia had sent its navy and coast guard to monitor the area “to ensure the sovereignty of the country.”

Shahidan also took to his personal Facebook page to provide the Malaysian public with further details about the country’s response as well as pictures of the feature in question. In the post, which was written in Malay, he said Malaysian navy and coast guard vessels had anchored around one nautical mile from the Chinese vessel to monitor its activities. He also clarified that the feature was not a case of overlapping claims but one of a foreign ship intruding into Malaysia’s waters.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal published on Monday, Shahidan said that Malaysia would also be taking further diplomatic action, and that Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak would himself raise the issue directly with Chinese President Xi Jinping. He also reiterated the fact that this was not an issue of overlapping claims.

“This is not an area with overlapping claims. In this case, we’re taking diplomatic action,” he said in the interview.

Malaysia – like many other countries – has registered such diplomatic protests before. What is interesting in this case is that the country is making a point to reveal publicly that it is doing so at the highest levels, rather than just carrying this out more quietly as it often does.

The relative hardening of Malaysia’s line in the South China Sea thus far should not be viewed as an abandonment of its ‘playing it safe’ approach.’ Though the response has been firmer and more public, it is still quite measured. Shahidan did not publicly condemn Beijing’s actions to a level that would prompt an escalatory Chinese response, and the Malaysian vessels have also been deployed cautiously. The Najib administration has proven unwilling to let the issue damage the Malaysia’s broader relationship with its largest trading partner, and there is little evidence to suggest this will change anytime soon. Malaysia is also no doubt aware that it is not capable of confronting Beijing directly. Indeed, as I have noted previously, the country has been careful to build in mechanisms to prevent escalation even when it does confront Chinese vessels, down to the number of ships deployed.

Nonetheless, it is notable that Beijing’s assertiveness in the South China Sea has been so alarming that it has even hardened the position of a country that – unlike the Philippines and Vietnam – has been traditionally quieter in how it expresses its reservations.


Luconia Shoals is situated about 55 nautical miles off the coast of Sarawak, which is within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) as stipulated in the United Nations Convention Laws of the Sea (UNCLOS).

This is not the first time PLA-N vessels have been stationed within Malaysian EEZ. Twenty months ago, it was at Beting Serupai (James Shoal).

PLA-N officers and seamen took an oath to “Defend their territory” when they had the armed troop carrier and two frigates. This, indirectly is PLA-N’s projection of power on areas which are clearly part of Malaysian EEZ.

Otherwise, it is part of the disputed territories which China claimed as theirs as part of the ‘Nine-Dash-Line’.

China's military maneurvres affecting neighbouring nations and region the past 40 years are centred on hydro-carbon deposits

China’s military maneurvres affecting neighbouring nations and region the past 40 years are centred on hydro-carbon deposits

China’s expansion attitude and aggressive tendency within the disputed areas is a growing concern. At least two ASEAN nations have had military stand-off against PLA-N.

Despite being a signatory to UNCLOS (1982) and Document of Conduct with ASEAN nations where the agreement was sealed to address mutual disputes through multilateral discussions, China insists on bilateral talks instead.

Jakarta Globe story:

Commentary: Is Asean Losing Its Way?

The Association of Southeast Asia Nations has prided itself on its “Asean Way” – an informal and non-legalistic way of doing business, especially its culture of consultations and consensus that have resolved disputes peacefully. That way of doing may be fading among signs the group’s unity is seriously eroding. Against the backdrop of the rise of an assertive China, signs of disunity spell trouble for the region.

There are several reasons for this disunity. First, Asean today is a much bigger entity. Membership expanded in the 1990s to include Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and Cambodia, with Timor Leste likely to be the 11th member. Asean’s functions and issues have also expanded. Economic cooperation has expanded from the idea of a free trade agreement to a more comprehensive economic community, which technically enters into force this year. Asean cooperation extends to a range of transnational issues from intelligence-sharing, counterterrorism, and maritime security to environmental degradation, air pollution, pandemics, energy security, food security, migration and people-smuggling, drug-trafficking, human rights and disaster management.

With an expanded membership, agenda and area of concern, it’s only natural that Asean will face more internal disagreements. It’s thus not surprising that one of the most serious breakdowns of consensus have involved its new members. Cambodia, as Asean’s chair, disastrously refused to issue a joint Asean communique in 2012 to please China – its new backer and aid donor – rejecting the position of fellow members, Philippines and Vietnam, on the South China Sea dispute.

Compounding challenges is the uncertain leadership of Indonesia. There are signs that the Jokowi government has downgraded Indonesia’s leadership role in Asean especially as the de facto consensus-builder of Asean on both intra- and extra-Asean conflicts, including the South China Sea. Jokowi’s “less multilateralism, more national interest” foreign policy approach, in sharp contrast to his predecessor Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s active leadership of Asean, could change. If not, the danger is that if the democratic, economically dynamic and stable Indonesia does not take Asean seriously neither will the world at large.
Without doubt, Asean’s main security challenge is the territorial disputes in the South China Sea. While not a new problem, the disagreement has telescoped due to recent Chinese activities. The most recent example: China’s reclamation activities in the Fiery Reef claimed by Vietnam and Mischief Reef and surrounding areas also claimed by the Philippines. This reflects a shift in China’s approach. While the Chinese military has pressed for land reclamation for some time, the leadership of Hu Jintao had resisted such moves. That restraint ended under the leadership of Xi Jinping, who is more prone to seek the PLA’s counsel in foreign policy issues related to national security and who has advanced China’s assertiveness on economic, diplomatic and military fronts. China is developing the islands further for both area denial and sea-control purposes and as a staging post for blue-water deployments into the Indian Ocean.

These developments challenge Asean’s role and “centrality” in the Asian security architecture. The economic ties of individual Asean members lead them to adopt varying positions. Until now, Asean’s advantage was that there was no alternative convening power in the region. But mere positional “centrality” is meaningless without an active and concerted Asean leadership to tackle problems, especially the South China Sea dispute.

Episodes such as the failure to issue a joint Asean communique in 2012 have led to the perception that Asean unity is fraying and China is a major factor. According to this view, China is out to divide and conquer Asean even as it pays lip-service to Asean centrality. This perception results from China’s seeming willingness to use disagreements within Asean, especially the consensus-breaking stance of Cambodia, insisting that Asean stay out of the South China Sea conflict, as an excuse to resist an early conclusion of the South China Sea Code of Conduct. China also takes the unwillingness of some Asean members to use strong language to criticize China as a sign of disunity. China cites earlier differences within Asean regarding the scope of the code of conduct over the inclusion of the Paracels, as desired by Hanoi. Moreover, China views the code as crisis-prevention tool rather than a dispute-settlement mechanism.

China needs to dispel perceptions that it is playing a divide-and-rule approach to Asean. It should also stop objecting to bringing the South China Sea question onto the agenda of the Asean Regional Forum and the East Asia Summit, on the pretext that not all Asean members are party to the dispute and outside countries such as the United States have no business even discussing the issue. This has the effect of undermining the very idea of Asean centrality or relevance that Beijing purports to uphold. It’s hard to see what the rationale for having these meetings might be without discussion of one of the most serious challenges to regional security and well-being.

As for Asean, it must not remove itself from the South China Sea issue. If anything, it should give even more focused attention to the disputes. One must not forget the lessons of the conflict triggered by the Vietnamese invasion and occupation of Cambodia from December 1978 to September 1989. Neither Vietnam nor Cambodia were members of Asean, and only Thailand was regarded as the “frontline state.” Then, Asean decided to involve itself in a conflict between two non-members because it considered the Vietnamese action a breach of regional norms and a threat to regional stability. Today, four of Asean members are parties to the conflict, out of which two are “frontline states”: Philippines and, ironically enough, Vietnam. The South China Sea conflict poses an even more serious threat to regional stability, and it is a legitimate concern of Asean as a group.

Finally, a word about the view put forward by some that Asean is irrelevant and should stay out of the South China conflict. The alternatives are few and bleak. US military action? It may have a deterrent value against the worst-case scenario of a full-blown Chinese invasion of the islands, but is unlikely to prevent the more likely scenario of China’s creeping expansion. Any US-China understanding is useful for crisis management, but Asean would have to worry whether in the long-term it would lead to US concessions to China – such as refraining from militarily and diplomatically challenging China’s position in the islands and surrounding areas. A decision by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague, which is considering a motion filed by the Philippines challenging the legality of China’s nine-dash line, may end up in Manila’s favor. This would help Asean, even if China rejects that verdict. But to make the most of such an opportunity, Asean would need to show collective support for such a verdict, and it might help if other claimants, such as Vietnam, also initiate similar legal action. China rejects a more direct role by the East Asia Summit, led by Asean anyway, because of US membership. The international community should render more support and encouragement to Asean to persist with its diplomacy in the conflict. And Indonesia needs to get back in this game.

Amitav Acharya is the Unesco Chair in Transitional Challenges and Governance at the School of International Service, American University, in Washington, DC. He is also past president of the International Studies Association, 2014-15, and author of The End of American World Order (Polity, 2014, Oxford India 2015, Shanghai People’s Press, 2016).


China expect to muscles her way through these one-one-one talks. Trade, would be an efficient consideration as a tool to achieve its strategic objectives.

Regardless, Malaysia should be firm about its diplomatic and trade relationship with China and slap the wrist when necessary.

Published in: on September 26, 2015 at 19:00  Comments (12)  

One Krypto: A secured messaging system for Malaysians

A review on the Malaysian secured messaging application which was build on AES-256 military grade encryption, now ready for the Malaysian market for commercial use.

Malaysian Company Creates App That Hides Your Messages – From Everyone


Print Email Details Published on Friday, 18 September 2015 08:59 Written by Mushamir Mustafa

One Krypto is here

One Krypto is here

With the proliferation of leaked secret documents – from Wikileaks to 1MDB’s banking details to the leak of dating and affairs website Ashley Madison’s passwords onto the internet, the need for protecting messages transmitted digitally is at an all time high.

And for those who have valuable information or wanting to hide the cat in the bag, secrecy and privacy has arrived in the form of an app. Is this too good to be true?

One Krypto is a wholly Malaysian developed app that allows users to communicate securely and includes several encrypted communication channels via chats, emails, voice and video.

The way it works is two people will have the app in their phones. Adam and Sarah add each other as friends, and now both have a ‘key’ code that is unique only to them. Now say Adam sends a message to Sarah using One Krypto, the message is encrypted on Adam’s phone, sent to One Krypto’s servers which then transfer the message to Sarah’s phone. The message is decrypted in Sarah’s phone, using their unique ‘key’.

In the end, while the message is placed in the server, it is encrypted, and no one can understand it, unless you have the key.

One Krypto aims to tap into this yet untapped market, banking on the growing need for privacy which applications have yet to provide.

Malaysian Digest sits down with the Vice President of Business Development, Wan Azrain Adnan of mTouche Technology, the developer of One Krypto to find out more about this potential game-changer in the crowded mobile app business.

mTouche Technology Vice President of Business Development, Wan Azrain Adnan Pic: Mushamir Mustafa

mTouche Technology Vice President of Business Development, Wan Azrain Adnan Pic: Mushamir Mustafa


Why One Krypto?: Because more often than not nowadays there are phones being hacked and tapped. We see that there’s a need now that people are beginning to be more privacy and security conscious as they are looking for more ways to communicate securely.. There’s a void in the market currently for a product that offers secured communications.

How different is it from Silent Circle? (Silent Circle also provides multi-platform secure communication services for mobile devices and desktop): Similar but not quite. One Krypto has it all in one application. We have different pricing and offerings. We do encryption end to end, peer to peer, meaning if someone were to come to our server you cannot see anything as it is encrypted. It will be encrypted on my device, the server acts as the postman, and once it reaches your device, then only will it be decrypted.

Is anything left in the servers? Who owns the servers? : We don’t keep anything in the server. It’s kept in people’s device, the server is just the post office. It will detect if you’re online then it will send the message. If you’re offline, it won’t deliver. Nothing is left in the server per se.

The different platforms of mobile communication enabled to be encrypted by One Krypto

The different platforms of mobile communication enabled to be encrypted by One Krypto

The server can be hacked, but you cannot read the mail. The primary technology that we use is the 256-bit AES encryption technology, a military grade encryption technology. Nobody has been able to hack it thus far.

How do we send each other messages?: You need to add the other person through the app and once approved, then only will the two of you exchange ‘keys’, which is unique. The key is a code, non-hackable. The key is within the phone.

What if one’s phone is stolen?: If stolen, well, there’s no way do deal with it. The only way for someone to view your communication is for someone to actually steal your phone and go into One Krypto per se. We do not discount the possibility of a remote lock function and in the pipeline we also want to release a video messaging platform.

We have what we call Stealth Mode, where we can hide the icon itself, which will reveal only once you’ve type in your passcode. (The app is still findable if you look through your phone’s apps in Settings). For us that could be the best line of defence as no one knows the app is present. Secondly we have a self-destruct timer for the messages, where after they have seen it, it will be deleted. Once it is deleted, it is deleted. Thirdly, we’ve disabled screen capture on Android devices (meaning you can’t use screen capture anymore) however for iOS devices we are restricted from doing so as its part of the software.


What if the police come asking for the data for an investigation?: If the police do come asking us to hand over confidential information for an ongoing investigation, for example, yes we can hand it over but it is encrypted. We would just give the police gibberish because the key is not with us, it’s with the two people. Even we don’t know the message ourselves. We are just the postman, we don’t know what’s inside the mail. We just take the mail and send it.

Right to privacy: People have the right to feel safe and to feel secure in their communications, whether they use the technology for something that is lawful or unlawful that is not up to us to decide. We are just tech providers and cannot tell someone how to use the technology. Just like hand phones, whatever you want to do with it, Celcom or Samsung cannot be at fault for whatever you do with it.

Why One Krypto and not Silent Circle?: There’s room for expansion for us in the Malaysian market. What we offer is much more cheaper, with our basic plan going at RM10 versus Silent Circle’s USD99.

Mobile phone security threats

Mobile phone security threats

On government surveillance: We have to serve the right to privacy and security of the public so until and unless Malaysia comes up with a limiting regulation to users in terms of mobile devices, then we’ll abide by it.

Can we use One Krypto for criminal, immoral purposes?: Even in the US they have yet to stop companies from using encryption. You can even sell nuclear bombs for all you want, or prostitute children, the concept is that we don’t know what people do with it. We are a tech company, we provide the service to serve the demand for privacy and security.

When will this be released?: We are about to commercialize One Krypto soon. Our testing has showed positive results, user acceptance is good, the application itself is user friendly, not much difference than what they are used to. Eventually one day we’d like our consumers to compare One Krypto with Whatsapp and other services. As far as we know, One Krypto is the only application with multiple communication channels under one application. Whatsapp started with chats then moved onto voice. We have three now, including email, and will also have video soon enough.

Who can use this?: Our target market includes (but not limited to) businesses which communicate and handle highly confidential information, regional businesses who need direct communication channels abroad, professionals who deal in highly confidential environments and clients, government officials and staff, and privacy conscious public.

What’s in store for the future: We want to expand into desktops, besides having video calls as well. Also we’d tailor the experience to suit people’s needs first, for example if business people prefer to use the calendar or business card reader first as opposed to the mass market.

Currently One Krypto is available for iOS and Android and may be expanding into Blackberry and Windows devices as well. Pricing starts from USD8.99 for 3 months to USD28.99 for 12 months.

For more information, check out http://www.onekrypto.com

– Malaysian Digest

Published in: on September 18, 2015 at 10:30  Leave a Comment  

One Krypto: A Secured Messaging System

In the recent wake of global mobile phone hacking and tapping, a secured messaging system in the form of application for Android and iOS platform mobile device has been introduced.

One Krypto is a mobile application which was developed totally by Malaysian programmers and mobile phone software engineers here in Malaysia. It was developed totally by private sector and now ready to be introduced into Malaysian mobile telco market.

One Krypto is here

One Krypto is here

One Krypto is a total communication application that allows encrypted communication via chats, emails, voice and video conferencing as well.

It is a secured way to communicate in one-to-one communication, as well as group communications via group chats and emails.

Mobile phone security threats

Mobile phone security threats

In one-to-one communication, there is a mutual key exchange between sender and receiver using RSA algorithm. Any third party will not be able to decrypt the messages without the key. All messages communicated via One Krypto use 256-bit AES encryption technology.

In Group chats, a mutual shared key within a group is used to encrypt and decrypt messages communicated via the group channel.

The different platforms of mobile communication enabled to be encrypted by One Krypto

The different platforms of mobile communication enabled to be encrypted by a single Android/iOS application One Krypto

In all the communication, only encrypted data will be sent via the line. Even if there is an interception by man in the middle, all they get is gibberish because they do not have the key to decrypt the actual message.

One Krypto also enables secure notes feature where users can keep their sensitive data encrypted in the application. Think of it as a physical safe that keeps all the private and confidential files, locked with a padlock, and the rightful owner has the lock to open it.

AES-256 military grade technology is used for the encryption of One Krypto

AES-256 military grade technology is used for the encryption of One Krypto

In short, One Krypto provides secure communication in the following ways :

  1. Secure Chats
  2. Secure Email
  3. Secure Voice Calls
  4. Secure Video Calls
Features of the One Krypto mobile application

Features of the One Krypto mobile application

Who can use One Krypto?

Our target market includes (but not limited to) :

  • Businesses which communicate and handle highly confidential information
  • Regional Businesses who need direct communication channels abroad
  • Professionals who deal in highly confidential environments and clients
  • Government Officials and Staff
  • Privacy conscious public
Published in: on September 13, 2015 at 11:31  Comments (3)  

Lessons from Paracels XXII: China cyber warfare scare

China has been reported to have deployed its sophisticated cyber warfare teams to hack US intelligence privy for clandestine information extraction.

Los Angeles times story:

China and Russia are using hacked data to target U.S. spies, officials say


Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, shown in Moutain View, Calif., says the military needs to boost its cyberdefenses. “We’re not doing as well as we need to do in job one in cyber, which is defending our own networks,” he said. (Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)
By BRIAN BENNETT AND W.J. HENNIGAN contact the reporters Asia Europe Russia China Cyber Crime Theft Blackmail and Extortion
Foreign spy services, especially in China and Russia, are aggressively aggregating and cross-indexing hacked U.S. computer databases — including security clearance applications, airline records and medical insurance forms — to identify U.S. intelligence officers and agents, U.S. officials said.

At least one clandestine network of American engineers and scientists who provide technical assistance to U.S. undercover operatives and agents overseas has been compromised as a result, according to two U.S. officials.

The Obama administration has scrambled to boost cyberdefenses for federal agencies and crucial infrastructure as foreign-based attacks have penetrated government websites and email systems, social media accounts and, most important, vast data troves containing Social Security numbers, financial information, medical records and other personal data on millions of Americans.


Counterintelligence officials say their adversaries combine those immense data files and then employ sophisticated software to try to isolate disparate clues that can be used to identify and track — or worse, blackmail and recruit — U.S. intelligence operatives.

Digital analysis can reveal “who is an intelligence officer, who travels where, when, who’s got financial difficulties, who’s got medical issues, [to] put together a common picture,” William Evanina, the top counterintelligence official for the U.S. intelligence community, said in an interview.

Asked whether adversaries had used this information against U.S. operatives, Evanina said, “Absolutely.”
Evanina declined to say which nations are involved. Other U.S. officials, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss internal assessments, say China and Russia are collecting and scrutinizing sensitive U.S. computer files for counterintelligence purposes.

U.S. cyberspying is also extensive, but authorities in Moscow and Beijing frequently work in tandem with criminal hackers and private companies to find and extract sensitive data from U.S. systems, rather than steal it themselves. That limits clear targets for U.S. retaliation.

The Obama administration marked a notable exception last week when a U.S. military drone strike near Raqqah, Syria, killed the British-born leader of the CyberCaliphate, an Islamic State hacking group that has aggressively sought to persuade sympathizers to launch “lone wolf” attacks in the United States and elsewhere.
Junaid Hussain had posted names, addresses and photos of about 1,300 U.S. military and other officials on Twitter and the Internet, and urged his followers to find and kill them, according to U.S. officials. They said he also had been in contact with one of the two heavily armed attackers killed in May outside a prophet Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas. Hussain is the first known hacker targeted by a U.S. drone.

The Pentagon also is scouring the leaked list of clients and their sexual preferences from the Ashley Madison cheating website to identify service members who may have violated military rules against infidelity and be vulnerable to extortion by foreign intelligence agencies.


Far more worrisome was last year’s cyberlooting — allegedly by China — of U.S. Office of Personnel Management databases holding detailed personnel records and security clearance application files for about 22 million people, including not only current and former federal employees and contractors but also their families and friends.

“A foreign spy agency now has the ability to cross-check who has a security clearance, via the OPM breach, with who was cheating on their wife via the Ashley Madison breach, and thus identify someone to target for blackmail,” said Peter W. Singer, a fellow at the nonprofit New America Foundation in Washington and coauthor of the book “Cybersecurity and Cyberwar.”

The immense data troves can reveal marital problems, health issues and financial distress that foreign intelligence services can use to try to pry secrets from U.S. officials, according to Rep. Adam B. Schiff of Burbank, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee.

“It’s very much a 21st century challenge,” Schiff said. “The whole cyberlandscape has changed.”
U.S. intelligence officials have seen evidence that China’s Ministry of State Security has combined medical data snatched in January from health insurance giant Anthem, passenger records stripped from United Airlines servers in May and the OPM security clearance files.

The Anthem breach, which involved personal data on 80 million current and former customers and employees, used malicious software that U.S. officials say is linked to the Chinese government. The information has not appeared for sale on black market websites, indicating that a foreign government controls it.

U.S. officials have not publicly blamed Beijing for the theft of the OPM and the Anthem files, but privately say both hacks were traced to the Chinese government.

The officials say China’s state security officials tapped criminal hackers to steal the files, and then gave them to private Chinese software companies to help analyze and link the information together. That kept the government’s direct fingerprints off the heist and the data aggregation that followed.
In a similar fashion, officials say, Russia’s powerful Federal Security Service, or FSB, has close connections to programmers and criminal hacking rings in Russia and has used them in a relentless series of cyberattacks.

According to U.S. officials, Russian hackers linked to the Kremlin infiltrated the State Department’s unclassified email system for several months last fall. Russian hackers also stole gigabytes of customer data from several U.S. banks and financial companies, including JPMorgan Chase & Co., last year.

A Chinese Embassy spokesman, Zhu Haiquan, said Friday that his government “firmly opposes and combats all forms of cyberattacks in accordance with the law.” The Russian Embassy did not respond to multiple requests for comment. U.S. intelligence officials want President Obama to press their concerns about Chinese hacking when Chinese President Xi Jinping visits the White House on Sept. 25.

After the recent breaches, U.S. cybersecurity officials saw a dramatic increase in the number of targeted emails sent to U.S. government employees that contain links to malicious software.
In late July, for example, an unclassified email system used by the Joint Chiefs and their staff — 4,000 people in all — was taken down for 12 days after they received sophisticated “spear-phishing” emails that U.S. officials suspect was a Russian hack.

The emails appeared to be from USAA, a bank that serves military members, and each sought to persuade the recipient to click a link that would implant spyware into the system.


Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said the hack shows the military needs to boost its cyberdefenses.

“We’re not doing as well as we need to do in job one in cyber, which is defending our own networks,” Carter said Wednesday. “Our military is dependent upon and empowered by networks for its effective operations…. We have to be better at network defense than we are now.”
Carter spent Friday in Silicon Valley in an effort to expand a partnership between the Pentagon, academia and the private sector that aims to improve the nation’s digital defenses. Carter opened an outreach office in Mountain View this year to try to draw on local expertise.

U.S. intelligence officers are supposed to cover their digital tracks and are trained to look for surveillance. Counterintelligence officials say they worry more about the scientists, engineers and other technical experts who travel abroad to support the career spies, who mostly work in U.S. embassies.

The contractors are more vulnerable to having their covers blown now, and two U.S. officials said some already have been compromised. They refused to say whether any were subject to blackmail or other overtures from foreign intelligence services.

But Evanina’s office, the National Counterintelligence and Security Center, based in Bethesda, Md., has recently updated pamphlets, training videos and desk calendars for government workers to warn them of the increased risk from foreign spy services.
“Travel vulnerabilities are greater than usual,” reads one handout. Take “extra precaution” if people “approach you in a friendly manner and seem to have a lot in common with you.”


This is very serious because China has been intensifying its intelligence and clandestine information operations through its cyber warfare units.

Six months ago, Pentagon admitted deploying its counter cyber warfare mechanisms to ward off these cyber attacks by the China’s crack cyber warfare teams.

Skynews story:

Pentagon Admits Cyberwarfare Plan For First Time

America’s Department of Defense intends to establish a full-time unit of computer experts in the San Francisco Bay area.
11:10, UK,
Thursday 23 April 2015
Pentagon in Washington DC
The US Department of Defense is taking on recruits to conduct cyberwarfare
The Pentagon has admitted for the first time it plans to use cyberwarfare in its battle to keep up with its enemies.

In a 33-page ‘cybersecurity strategy’ the US Department of Defense has publicly laid out the approach plans to take.

The document says the DoD “should be able to use cyber operations to disrupt an adversary’s command and control networks, military-related critical infrastructure and weapons capabilities”.

The previous strategy, published in 2011, made little reference to clandestine warfare using computer networks, although US officials are known to have spoken privately about the issue.

Reports in 2013 claimed that senators had received a closed-door briefing on how the New York City power grid could be taken down by a computer virus.
Play video “2014: China Source Of Most Attacks”

Video: 2014: China Source Of Most Attacks
The television reports said officials had told NBC off the record that the US was already employing cyberwarriors who were capable of shutting down the power system of a smaller country – like Iran.

The new document takes a more open approach because the Pentagon wants more transparency in its cyber mission – and because it could be a deterrent to adversaries.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter said: “I think it will be useful to us for the world to know that, first of all, we’re going to protect ourselves, we’re going to defend ourselves.”

He added that the new strategy is “more clear and more specific about everything, including (US) offence”.

Play video “Cybercrime As Lucrative As Drugs”

Video: Cybercrime As Lucrative As Drugs
The strategy also, for the first time, refers to US concerns over cyber-espionage by China.

China admitted the existence of dedicated cyber warfare units in a document produced by the People’s Liberation Army earlier this year, according to the Daily Beast.

The hacking of Sony’s emails last year, which the US government blamed on North Korea, also showed the dangers to American interests from other unfriendly states.

The document says the US will continue to try to work with Beijing to bring greater understanding and transparency of each nation’s cyber missions to “reduce the risks of misperception and miscalculation”.
Play video “Latest Strategy To Tackle Terror”

Video: Latest Strategy To Tackle Terror
“One of the things we need to do is have that dialogue,” said Mr Carter.

According to officials, Mr Carter is setting up a full-time unit of military, civilian and reservist workers in the San Francisco Bay area in the next month or so.

But he said one of the things holding back progress was that the US military suffers from a lack of “coolness”.

He said some of the bright young recruits the DoD needs to maintain its war are more likely to want to work for Silicon Valley’s top tech firms, rather than with the Pentagon.


The China’s cyber warfare aggression which demonstrated its threatening capabilities has escalated into a very serious defense agenda.

The Diplomat story:

China’s Growing Cyberwar Capabilities

A recent attack on GitHub highlights China’s growing expertise – and aggression – in cyberspace.

By Marcel A. Green
April 13, 2015

With recent news suggesting that the recent massive denial-of-service attacks against online hosting and code-sharing site GitHub was either sponsored or encouraged by Chinese authorities, the spotlight has once again been turned on China’s intentions in cyberspace and whether or not its activities pose a threat to worldwide, and especially U.S. cybersecurity.

China is one of the most active nations in cyberspace. Moreover, China has made no secret that President Xi Jinping’s “new model of great power relations” policy means that it will not be afraid to challenge the U.S. and the rest of the world in areas it considers a core interest, such as cyberspace.

Much like the U.S., China has devoted substantial money, manpower and resources to developing its cyber capabilities. Chinese cyber capabilities include a mix of dedicated personnel, advanced equipment, and cyberattack methodologies. According to the cybersecurity firm Mandiant, since as early as 2006, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has been using an elite cyberwarfare unit based in Shanghai to launch hundreds of cyberattacks targeting American interest. The unit, officially known as Unit 61398, operates under the PLA’s Second Bureau of the General Staff Department’s (GSD) Third Department, which is focused on cyber surveillance and monitoring of foreign electronic communications. Unit 61398 has a staff of “hundreds if not thousands” of people, trained in advanced network security, digital signal processing, and covert communications who have access extensive “infrastructure of computer systems around the world.” Recently the Taipei Times reported that Taiwan’s National security Bureau (NSB) has identified another unit of the GSD’s Third Department that is involved in cyber-activities. This unit has been revealed to be Third Department’s Sixth Bureau based out of Wuhan University in Hubei Province. According to the NSB, the Sixth Bureau is “engaged in technical aspects of surveillance and intelligence gathering on the Taiwanese agencies, intercepting telecommunications signals, hacking computers and mobile phone service networks and satellite imagery reconnaissance.”

In addition to its official cyberwarfare units, China is believed to also have “reached out” to people with the necessary cyber skills in the IT sector and academic community to help fill any gaps in state expertise and personnel when needed. As the GitHub attacks illustrate, there is also ample evidence that China uses hackers and other cybercriminals to accomplish operations that it is officially unwilling or unable to commit. To be sure, cybercrime is often intimately tied to state-sponsored threats to cybersecurity. The use of affiliated hackers is based on the idea that cybercriminals can be used to escape the attribution that may otherwise provide the necessary legal, military or diplomatic links that other countries can use to prove China’s official participation in cyberattacks. Consequently, in October 2014, the FBI issued a warning that a Chinese hacking collective known as Axiom has been engaged in a well-resourced, sophisticated campaign to steal valuable data from U.S. government agencies. According to the warning, Axiom, and other state-sponsored Chinese hacking groups like them, are “exceedingly stealthy and agile by comparison” to Unit 61398. Later in 2014, the U.S. Department of Justice indicted five Chinese citizens, affiliated with Unit 61398 on charges of theft of business information and unauthorized access to the computers of a number of U.S. companies.

China’s cyber capabilities are organized by a strategy that calls for the early application of its cyberwarfare units against an adversary “to establish information dominance.” Information dominance refers to: (1) taking and maintaining control of an adversary’s access to its own information, and (2) disrupting the flow of information necessary for “decision-making or combat operations.” Information dominance, moreover, requires that Chinese cyber capabilities are deployed pre-emptively or as early as necessary to support more traditional combat actions. Moreover, establishing information dominance requires China to have a fairly extensive and ongoing knowledge of an adversary’s capabilities.

Lastly, in order to achieve its cyber strategic goals and effectively make use of its cyberwarfare units, China has employed a wide range of advanced cyberattack methodologies. For instance, The PLA’s Unit 61398 is known for its use of zero-day exploits. A zero-day exploit refers to vulnerability in software that the software maker itself does not know exists. Discovering zero-day exploits require broad access to a software developer’s internal routines and procedures. It also requires a better understanding of the software then the developer. This is often achieved by employing a technique known as advanced persistent threat (APT). APT refers to a hacking process that involves a long-term campaign to break into a computer network, avoid detection, and harvest valuable information over days, months and even years. According to Mandiant, Unit 61398’s informal name was APT1 due to their skill at successfully carrying out advanced persistent threats.

Understanding China’s cyber capabilities will play a large role in resolving the challenge of determining the appropriate response that the U.S. and other nations can make to cyberattacks that can be attributed to China. Where the attack can be traced to an official Chinese organ, perhaps a diplomatic or military response will be suitable. Where the attack is traced to non-official organs, non-conventional responses such as economic sanctions or criminal penalties will prove more effective.

Marcel A. Green is an attorney and legal researcher specializing in American and Chinese Criminal Law.


Published in: on September 2, 2015 at 23:45  Comments (6)  

Thames House in Perdana Putra

Lately, there are many speculators attempting to create the feeling of uneasiness and doubts against Prime minister Dato’ Sri Mohd. Najib Tun Razak’s leadership and administration, with insnuating against all the recent transfers of law enforcement agencies senior officers.

The Malay Mail online:

Senior Special Branch officer gets sudden transfer to PM’s Dept, told to go on long leave


Wednesday August 19, 2015
06:44 PM GMT+8
A special ceremony was conducted behind closed doors in Bukit Aman earlier today, which saw Abdul Hamid passing on the baton as deputy director of the police intelligence agency to an assistant, Datuk Mohd Haniff Hanudin. — Picture by Yap Tzu Ging

KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 19 — In another abrupt change within government agencies, Datuk Abdul Hamid Bador was today transferred out of the Special Branch (SB) and into the Prime Minister’s Department where he will head a new security division reporting directly to Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

A special ceremony was conducted behind closed doors in Bukit Aman earlier today, which saw Abdul Hamid passing on the baton as deputy director of the police intelligence agency to an assistant, Datuk Mohd Haniff Hanudin who was heading a unit called E4 that deals with the political extremist threat.

Abdul Hamid confirmed the transfer when contacted, but said he was in the dark on the reasons for his abrupt work shift.

“No… they just told me to go to JPM, so I go to JPM lah,” he told Malay Mail Online when contacted, using the Malay abbreviation for the Prime Minister’s Department.

“No reason given and I just received the letter yesterday… earlier today, there was a ceremony to hand over my duty.”

He added that he would take up his new duties at the Prime Minister’s Department on September 2, as he was currently on leave from work.

Malay Mail Online understands Abdul Hamid was ordered to go on “long leave” before assuming new duties as the head of a new security and transnational crime division under Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Abdul Razak.

Contacted today, Bukit Aman confirmed Abdul Hamid’s transfer and that the latter is on leave but denied knowledge on his next posting.

Abdul Hamid’s promotion is the latest change to take place within the SB following last month’s shock Cabinet reshuffle, which saw Datuk Seri Mohamad Fuzi Harun replacing Datuk Seri Akhil Bulat as SB director.

– See more at: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/senior-special-branch-officer-gets-sudden-transfer-to-pms-dept-told-to-go-o#sthash.Cc14A7nc.dpuf


It is clear that a ‘Thames House’ establishment is being created under the Prime Minister’s Office. It is no mystery for the creation nor should any be doubt and/or suspicion about it, being right under the purview of the Executive.

Globally, terrorism, cyberterrorism and anarchism are issues of growing grave concern.

Whether it is a matter for the political masters, civil servants, law enforcement agencies, analysts and observers or academicians, efforts are made to ensure that the understanding and management information is good and current.

It is also important that information on the issues made available through media, be it mainstream or social channels, are being monitored and management. Failure, could compound the matter worse.

Hence, it should not be a surprise nor skeptical that an experience law enforcement agent specialising in intelligence is the man for the job.

These days, politics and terrorism are intertwined. Add complex global networking to it, suddenly it is any nation’s intelligence and internal security nightmare.

The problem should be mitigated long before it appears in the form of demonstration with casualties and destruction, avoiding the sticky situation of ‘getting wiser after the event’.

Combining and making a formidable agency of functions and experience of the Police Special Branch and Counter Terrorism and the Research Department of Prime Minister’s Department, is the right direction and initiative.

British entertainment and BBC buffs would related to Dato’ Hamid Bador’s new job as the combination of the characters of Sir Henry James “Harry” Pearce of MI5 and Sir Oliver Mace of Joint Intelligence Committee, from the long running acclaimed drama ‘Spooks’.

We highly recommend our readers to watch all the ten seasons of ‘Spooks’ and the upcoming film ‘Spooks: The Greater Good’, to understand what Hamid and his new agency is all about.

Published in: on August 19, 2015 at 23:30  Comments (23)  

Hunting the hunter

Royal Malaysian Police obtained a warrant of arrest from Kuala Lumpur High Court to seek and detain Sarawak Report Editor-in-Chief Clare Rewcastle-Brown for crimes “Detrimental to Parliamentary democracy”.

The Star story:

Published: Tuesday August 4, 2015 MYT 7:23:00 PM
Updated: Tuesday August 4, 2015 MYT 8:06:14 PM

Arrest warrant for Sarawak Report editor


PETALING JAYA: Police have obtained an arrest warrant for Sarawak Report founder and editor Clare Rewcastle-Brown (pic).

Bukit Aman CID director Comm Datuk Seri Mohmad Salleh said in a statement on Tuesday that the arrest warrant issued by a Kuala Lumpur court was for activities detrimental to parliamentary democracy under Section 124B and 124I of the Penal Code.

Section 124I deals with publication of false reports or makes false statements likely to cause public alarm via newspapers, periodicals or other printed publication or electronic means.

Jail term for the offences can be extended to between five and 10 years.

“We will proceed with applications to place her on the Aseanpol wanted list, as well as the Interpol red notice,” Comm Mohmad said.


The irony, Rewcastle-Brown has now been issued a warrant of arrest herself when a few days ago she lied about former Attorney General Tan Sri Gani Patail was sacked for the falsified warrant of arrest issued on Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Mohd. Najib Tun Razak.

Like expected, Rewcastle-Brown is defiant about the warrant of arrest issued and conveniently throw in the ‘Right to express’ as her lame excuse for all the compounded and habitual slander and lies she did against Malaysian leaders and State and Federal Governments.

Pro-Anwarista news portal story:

Response to warrant of arrest from Malaysian police – Clare Rewcastle-Brown

Published: 4 August 2015 10:03 PM

I have been asked for a response on this latest move by the Malaysian authorities to attempt to extradite me by issuing a warrant for my arrest, which they say they will pass to Interpol.

My first comment is that this action could hardly be more counter-productive on the part of a government that is seeking to assure the world that it is a sane democracy.

My action has been to publish information, which some in power do not like. Yet, the “crime” they are accusing me of is of “an activity detrimental to democracy”.

It is they who are being detrimental to democracy by suppressing free speech and arresting people for questioning people in authority.
I am still unclear whether the agents of Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak are accusing me of “forging false documents” or obtaining documents through “criminal leakages”, since they have simultaneously accused me of both in the past few days and have been rounding up all sorts of senior investigators to try and find out who might have passed me such leaks.

They need to make up their minds about this before they bring their charges and they really ought to produce some substantive and convincing evidence of their other accusation that I am part of some international plot intent on falsely accusing the prime minister of crimes for reasons unknown.

I am merely an investigative journalist who has been doing my job, by unravelling one hell of an international scandal involving people in high places and the grand larceny of public monies.

It is as simple as that – no plot and no vested interest. The interest of the public is my motivation and duty.

Conversely, the public are at liberty to reach their own conclusions over what has motivated the recent actions of the prime minister of Malaysia, who has spent the past few days, sacking, removing and arresting just about anybody who has been officially engaged in investigating the scandal I have been reporting on, that is, the missing billions from 1MDB.

Moreover, he has not just attacked my blog and myself, but other reputable news organisations, closing down two papers in Malaysia.

If the prime minister had nothing to hide in this matter and if my reports were false there would be numerous more orthodox and far less disruptive methods of dealing with me than sacking his deputy prime minister, sacking the Attorney-General, closing down the PAC, and dismissing members of his Cabinet.

He could simply have issued libel proceedings or he could have produced evidence (eg. correct bank statements and transfer documents) that would have shown my reports to be untrue. – August 4, 2015.

* Clare Rewcastle Brown is founder and editor of whistleblower website Sarawak Report.

– See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/sideviews/article/response-to-warrant-of-arrest-from-malaysian-police-clare-rewcastle-brown#sthash.6iqpPAd6.dpuf


If Rewcastle-Brown is truly a bonafide investigative journalist, then she has no reason to not participate in the investigation that has been brought against her. Infact, if she is charged in a criminal court, then it is her opportunity to prove herself with her research materials.

The Royal Malaysian Police will sought the assistance and authorities of the Interpol to track and arrest Rewcastle-Brown.

Rewcastle-Brown should also be investigated for criminal defamation for her slanderous stories against Malaysian leadership personalities such as (then Sarawak Chief Minister) Tun Abdul Taib Mahmud, Prime Minister Najib and Sabah Chief Minister Dato’ Seri Panglima Musa Aman.

In the video, Rewcastle-Brown arrogantly stated she wanted to defend herself by presenting herself in Kuching in person. By that extension, she should also willing to be brought to Kuala Lumpur for the investigation for the serious crimes against the Malaysian democracy that she has been accused of.

The past five years, she has been very incessant in her attacks against the Sarawak State Government (then under Chief Minister Tan Sri Taib Mahmud), Sabah State Government (under Chief Minister Dato’ Seri Panglima Musa Aman) and now Prime Minister Najib.

Unlike a true journalist who is out to bring out the truth, Rewcastle-Brown never gave the opportunity for those she is gunning down in all the Sarawak Report writings any opportunity for the right to rebutt. In short, she used her journalism and research methodological skills to victimised politicians with her voracious and venomous presentation of stories and habitual lies.

The mercenary political writer is defiant that she is “A victim of extraordinary series of recent events” and the Malaysian democracy isn’t true and she would get fairness if ever her case was brought to the courts.

Channel News Asia story:

‘I’m not scared’: Sarawak Report’s Clare Brown on arrest warrant for her in Malaysia

“I am just the latest victim in an extraordinary series of recent events in Malaysia,” says the London-based founder of investigative journalism site Sarawak Report.

By Olly Barratt, Channel NewsAsia Correspondent
POSTED: 05 Aug 2015 01:23 UPDATED: 05 Aug 2015 05:11

4865 52 1 Email


LONDON: The founder of alternative news site Sarawak Report Clare Rewcastle Brown describes an arrest warrant put out for her as an “irrational” move on the Malaysian government’s part, done entirely for “domestic consumption”.

Malaysian police announced the arrest warrant on Tuesday (Aug 4), on the basis that Ms Brown is involved in “activity detrimental to parliamentary democracy” and for the dissemination of false reports which is an offence under the Malaysian penal code.

Ms Brown, the sister-in-law of former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said she does not think Malaysian authorities have a chance of extraditing her.

The Sarawak Report website was recently blocked in Malaysia, for posing a “threat to national stability”, following reports that claimed Prime Minister Najib Razak had up to US$700 milllion deposited into his personal accounts from state investment fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB). A Special Task Force probe concluded that the money deposited in Mr Najib’s accounts was from donations and not from 1MDB.

Below is Channel NewsAsia’s interview with Ms Brown.

Q: What was your reaction to hearing of the arrest warrant?

Ms Brown: Somewhat surprised. It seems very irrational and counterproductive to issue these sorts of threats that can’t be carried through.

Q: Why do you say that they can’t be carried through?

Ms Brown: Well, because I don’t think that they would ever get this petition through a court in a normal democracy like the UK, which is where I am. They are trying to arrest me for some kind of action against democracy, which is ironic given that it is the Malaysian government which has been taking actions against democracy by silencing free media and closing down my blog and indeed several newspapers and arresting a number of people who have done nothing more than raise some perfectly valid issues.

I don’t think they have got a chance in h**l of extraditing me from the UK.

Q: What is your response in terms of actions – will you be taking any actions in response to this warrant being issued? Will you need to talk to UK authorities? What do you do next?

Ms Brown: I’m besieged by media interviews at the moment, so I am going to be talking about Najib Razak on a very wide platform – so in a way, he could not have done anything more counter-productive than to provide me with that platform to discuss some of the issues that are causing considerable alarm at the moment in Malaysia.

I am just the latest victim in an extraordinary series of recent events in Malaysia – the Prime Minister sacked his deputy, sacked his Attorney-General, closed down the Public Accounts Committee; he has gone round arresting a whole lot of senior law enforcers investigating a very very concerning financial scandal in Malaysia and really everybody in Malaysia is asking: “Why?”

Well I am not sure if he is accusing me of forging documents or having criminally obtained documents, because obviously he can’t accuse me of both. I have been accused of both by him and his supporters but really they have to decide which they are going to charge me of, and Malaysians are left scratching their heads.

Q: The Special Task Force concluded that these monies transferred into the PM’s account were donations. What did you make of those conclusions?

A month on, and one might say several arrests, sacking and dismissals on, the Prime Minister has now finally had it announced through the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission that that was not anything to do with 1MDB money, which actually certainly I and I don’t know of any investigative reporters who said it was, he is saying that was just a donation, an anonymous donation and really Malaysians are asking: “Who donated and where did the money go? Is it correct that the Prime Minister should have been secretly donated US$700 million?”

Q: Do you recognise that it is easier for you to do this job here now than it would be in Malaysia?

Ms Brown: I have been accused of interfering in Malaysia and one of the reasons I have felt justified in concentrating on so many of the subjects around Malaysia that I have done is because so many Malaysian journalists and other Malaysians have said: “Thank goodness you’re able to print this because we can’t.”

There is maybe an illusion that there is a free media in Malaysia. There is not a free media in Malaysia, and I think what you’re seeing at the moment – the closure of respected business publications who have also been covering this enormous scandal, missing billions from the public development fund, just shows how little freedom of the press there is in Malaysia so that is partially why I’m doing it.

Q: With this warrant having been issued, will you ever be able to go back to Malaysia?

Ms Brown: I’m sure as long as Najib Razak is Prime Minister, I would be ill-advised.

Q: And how does that make you feel?

Ms Brown: I’ll live. I’ll continue to write about Malaysian issues and I’ll continue to interest myself in these matters – but you know, there are plenty of people in Malaysia who are suffering far worse than me as a result of these undemocratic actions that have been taken by the government at the moment. There are people in jail, there are people who have been arrested and not given their rightful access to legal representation. I’m not going to start feeling sorry for myself that I’m not allowed to be there too.

Q: And to return to where we started on the warrant itself being issued – how do you believe that reflects on the government of Malaysia?

Ms Brown: I think it is going to show the government of Malaysia up as being perhaps not quite under control at the moment actually. It’s such an irrational action, the rest of the international community is going to ask what is it that I’ve done that is detrimental to democracy, that’s the charge I’m facing. It’s an Orwellian charge, it is not a crime that exists in real democratic countries.

I think the Prime Minister has given up worrying what the rest of the world thinks about this action. I think this is purely for domestic consumption. I have had a lot of Malaysians ring up and say: “Clare, are you scared?” And I say, “I’m not scared, this isn’t about intimidating me, this is about intimidating his own domestic population.

– CNA/dl


Rewscatle-Brown is also implicated in the extortion case of former Petro Saudi executive Xavier A. Justo against his former employer, now actively being investigated by Royal Thai Police.

Of late, her credibility and journalism integrity is highly questionable if not greatly diminished after she was proven to either has been lying or falsifying evidence in her stories, intended to gun down the said leaders.

It is believed that Rewcastle-Brown is being funded by Neo Con Jews such as George Soros through organisations such as Open Forum and Global Witness, as part of the agenda to destabilise and topple democratically elected government.

Her manipulation of facts and intertwined with fabricated information tendered as ‘evidence’ and habitual lies, all concocted in well presented stories which seemingly guised as a well researched papers, is over.

The fact that since Justo has been busted in Thailand and started to spill out his beans where Rewcastle-Brown is heavily implicated in the extortion case investigation, she started to be on the defensive mode. It is a clear demonstration that she is guilty and her credence started to dwindle, downwards.

The tide for sister-in-law of the last Labour British Prime Minister who abetted his boss and conspired lie the British public for support to attack Iraq twelve years and subjected millions to anguish and pain based on lies of the ‘Weapons of Mass Destruction’, has now turned.

She has just became the prey after her reign of terror her own game of lies in the cybersphere as the predator, came to an abrupt ended.

*Updated 1000hrs

Published in: on August 5, 2015 at 01:00  Comments (23)  

Clear and present danger

Home Minister Dato’ Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi issued a stern warning to those who are out to ridicule and demonize the Prime Minister and his administration with distorted information and lies, deemed as a national threat.
imageIt is without a doubt that there clear concerted effort to by foreign and domestic bodies, to confuse the rakyat with distorted and fabricated information laced in emotional-charging connotation with specific sinister agenda.

It is clear that London-based Sarawak Report which is funded by Global Witness and Open Soceity Forum, creatures which were created by New Con Jew George Soros who is known as a ‘rogue’ due to his tendency to challenge and disrupt economic system, philosophy, norms and values and promote liberalism, LGBT and civil liberty.

Then there is Wall Street Journal which is part of another Neo Con Jew Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp media empire worked in tandem with Sarawak Report and a staunch Anwarista Tong Kooi Ong’s media arm The Edge and BFM, all echoing the same unsubstantiated stories.

All these consistent echoing of messages and drumming of mismanagement, corruption and abuse of strategic investment corporation 1MDB are designed to ridicule, arouse the sentiment the rakyat and eventually topple Prime Minister Najib’s administration.

Protection Group International (PGI) admitted that the information on Petro Saudi and 1MDB venture wasn’t correct but instead of rectifying the errors, Xavier Justo went to Sarawak Report instead.

The Malay Mail story:


Sarawak Report data on 1MDB ‘unreliable’, says PGI chief


Sunday July 5, 2015
06:50 AM GMT+8


PETALING JAYA, July 5 — Protection Group International (PGI) managing director Brian Lord said Sarawak Report’s information on the alleged impropriety in PetroSaudi International Ltd’s aborted joint venture with 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) was “inconsistent” and “unreliable”.

Speaking to Malay Mail, he said there were inconsistencies between the original information and what was published by the blog. He also revealed the cyber security firm was hired by PetroSaudi to investigate the source of the data published online and verify its authenticity.

“When one does the compare and contrast of the data in the systems with the one in Sarawak Report, there are inconsistencies,” Lord said.

He said if an individual believes a wrongdoing had occured, he could report the matter to the authorities in Malaysia, Switzerland or United Kingdom or take it to an established media.

“But he (arrested Swiss national Xavier Justo) didn’t do that.

“Having gone through the process of trying to extort money from the former employer with threats to leak the data and being refused, he (Justo) could have still gone to the authorities had there been any wrong doing. But he chose to go to Sarawak Report.

“I am not making any comment on the political persuasion of Sarawak Report but he chose to take it to that kind of blog site. So even before we move on to the forensics, any information that he presented to the public after that process has to be treated with a huge amount of caution,” said Lord who has more than 20 years experience in cyber security.

Lord added investigations by PGI revealed Sarawak Report had a “subtract of some emails chain and some documentation”. He, however, stopped short of divulging the contents of the emails and data Sarawak Report received.

“It is a combination of all those three things; inconsistency between the original and published reports, substitutable communication and the whole private information claim into Sarawak Report … I can firmly say the information is unreliable and, therefore, it is unfair for anybody to draw judgments on it.”

Justo, a former PetroSaudi executive, was arrested in Thailand last month after he was alleged to have leaked information to Sarawak Report. He was being investigated for extortion and blackmailing his former employer.

Justo had allegedly attempted to blackmail and extort as much as 2.5 million Swiss Francs (RM10 million) from PetroSaudi two years after he was dismissed from the company. He also allegedly threatened to release confidential business information, purportedly stolen from the company, if his demands were not met.

Following the attempted blackmail, various emails and documents were published by Sarawak Report, sparking criticism against 1MDB.

According to Lord, investigations into the case were led by two analysts who between them had worked on at least 1,000 forensic cases.

“These are people who are highly-regarded specialist in what they do. They have investigated all types of cases involving all types of background. When it comes to the validity and velocity of the company, they have vast experience,” he said.

In stressing the firm’s independence, Lord said investigations were conducted in a controlled environment with no access granted to anyone outside of the forensic investigators, with devices obtained from those involved kept in a forensic laboratory.

“Nobody else, including the client, has access to the laboratory where the investigations are conducted. It is key for the investigations to be uncontaminated. In this particular case, we still have the devices under our custody until every line of investigation related to this has ended.”

He said the forensic analysis into this case could take up to six months.

“That leads back to the point of depending on what level of granularity the process requires and whether that is inclined to a subsequent legal process. That leads to a point where there are things that we can say and can’t,” he added.

● On a company spokesman quoted by an English daily

“Clients want a clear, unambiguous and unbiased view of what the investigations will show. We are obliged to adhere to certain standards on how we operate. Forensics investigations can take a long time depending on what level of information is required. At that point thereof, where there is a complete lack of clarity over things, that requires a public statement. But we will only make statements which we are sure we can validate. In forensics investigations, there are points that can be established quite quickly and there are things that require more time to go into deeper analysis. But there are certain points throughout the investigation where things will become clear and if it does help clarify the situation, particularly in the case like this where a lot of it is being played up in public domain, sometimes it (a statement) can be helpful for both parties.”

● On the implication of such articles

“Responsible media outlets such as newspapers check their sources, the validity of such sources and information as well as the motive of the sources before an editorial decision is made to publish. That is a sensible, matured decision. If a blogging site is considered as an independent voice, then it has to do the same thing and if it chooses to just publish random information obtained, then it has no right to be taken seriously. I support the Sarawak Report’s right to publish whatever political opinion they have … people have different opinions, but the point remains how seriously would it take itself if it gets hold of data obtained inappropriately and chooses to publish it in that way, editorialising it to meet political ends. Freedom of speech comes with responsibility.”

– See more at: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/sarawak-report-data-on-1mdb-unreliable-says-pgi-chief#sthash.y0aNMJ1i.dpuf


The objective is rather quite clear. Prime Minister Najib is up and rising into the world geo-political arena, moreover in his call for ‘moderation of interpretation and practice of Islam’ against the flavour of extremism by very minority pockets of Muslims who are causing detrimental global perception towards Islam and Muslims.

This extremism by these pockets of terrorists using very skewed interoperation of ultraconservative Islam has taken centre stage in many countries and compounded further with their sophisticated use of social media networks to grow support from common people.

Prime Minister Najib’s ‘Wasatiyyah’ agenda earned recognition by world leaders such as President Barack H Obama and Prime Minister David Cameron.

This is the current global bogey man, in the current geo-political turmoil such as in Ukraine, Iraq, Yemen, Libya and the on going tug-of-war game in South China Sea.

Prime Minister Najib administration now chairs the Association of South East Asian Nation (ASEAN) and sits as a non permanent member of the United Nations Security Council.

It is quite clear that it is imperative for the New Con Jews act to ensure that an upcoming global leader like Prime Minister Najib could be subdued to their agenda or otherwise, politically eliminate him.

*Updated 1800hrs

Published in: on July 5, 2015 at 10:58  Comments (5)  

The corporate rationalisation for a political solution

Dato’ Johari Abdul Ghani

It is quite unorthodox that a corporate rational and thought process is the most likely solution to address a political conundrum, especially complex variables are factored into the political equation.

This posting is the extension on the rational why MP for Titiwangsa Dato’ Johari Abdul Ghani is our choice for the post of Minister of Defence, if and when Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Mohd. Najib Tun Razak decides to have a Cabinet reshuffle. The Cabinet reshuffle is deemed timely because of the half electoral term just over for the Parliament XIII.

The position of the Minister of Defence possess different challenges today against what it was when Tunku Abdul Rahman Al Haj formed his first Cabinet. Again the whole of the 1960s, through the geo-political complexity as Malaya still faces the communist rebellion threat and later when Malaysia was formed, the threat from Indonesia.

The 70s, 80s, 90s and the first decade of 21st century have their own challenges and demands from the Ministry of Defence (MoD). The Cabinet Minister in charge had to balance between policy, expansion plan, doctrine, acquisition implementation, operational status and moral of the personnel and most of all, budget.

Now in the second half of the second decade of the 21st century, the challenges and demands in MoD is even more complex and layered. Getting the balance between policy, expansion plan, doctrine, acquisition implementation, operational status and moral of the personnel got to be extrapolated to the geo-political scenario and Malaysia’s own foreign policy.

The requirements for more assets, operational capability and peace-time secondary operation such as in crisis and emergency in the likes of the missing MH370, kidnapings and hijackings on and off the coast, disaster relieve such as the Great Flood of December 2014 and the Kinabalu Earthquake, compounded to the already long list of ‘must haves’.

Just for size, let us throw in some issues that are already pressing if not critical to be addressed.

1. The replacement program for the RMAF MiG-29Ns interceptors (which is over 22 years old in service)

2. The replacement program for the RMAF F/A-18Ds multirole combat aircraft (which is 18 years old in service)

3. The replacement program for the RMAF S61 Nuris (which is over 47 years old in service – original )

4. The replacement program for Laksmana Class corvettes (Which age is actually 31 years old but in service with RMN since 1999)

5. The upgrade of the RMAF C130H Hercules transporters

6. The new generation RMN Gowind Class littoral combat ships

7. The continuation of the RMN NGPV Kedah Class program

8. The additional requirement for the RMAF A400M multirole strategic transport aircrafts (on order is only four)

9. The additional requirement for the RMAF EC725 Cougar utility helicopters (on order is only twelve)

10. The maritime/anti submarine patrol aircraft programs

11. The Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft programs

The non traditional threats for Malaysia should be  taken into the consideration, where Malaysia is a maritime nation. Factors such as the 4,675km coast line and mass body of water between Peninsula and Sarawak and Sabah and the EEZ of 200 nautical miles as per the UNCLOS, requires a strong armed forces to ensure the interest of the nation is protected.

The patrol, surveillance, protection of this important element for the Federation is pertinent, as this mass body of water is where a major portion of food and hydrocarbon is extracted. The water ways around the nation is the important component of the nation’s trade.

The seas also provide revenue from tourism.

Hence, to ensure all the requirements are being addressed and met, the nation has got to provide the necessary investment for the acquisition, development, operation and maintenance of all these said programs.

All of these programs require huge sums of funds. For size, the Gowind program alone for six vessels and combat systems which would be undertaken by Boustead Heavy Industries is expected to cost slightly less than RM11 billion.

In aggregate, to have all these programs delivered require a lot money and in the challenges of the fiscal management by Treasury, it is deemed that it is impossible it could be funded from the conventional means.

Hence, to be able to deliver all these requirements and acquire all these assets, innovative ways are the solution. Solution like deals and packages made through extended sophisticated commercial programs, would be the avenue for these assets to the acquired and MoD requirements met.

That is where Dato’ Johari Abdul Ghani comes in. He is a chartered accountant with vast corporate experience. Taking over and restructuring plcs and later expand its operation and increase the market capitalisation was part of his illustrious track record as a corporate leader.

Hence, someone like him would expected to posses the ability to strategise and package deals between the Federal Government, GLCs, OEMs and the long term contracts for the consideration.

The acquisition of these assets could be realised the hybrid of constructing under license and with partners of friendly nations that have similar acquisition, in the effort to lower the cost of economies. The package of maintenance, repair and overhaul could also be factored.

All these costs could be aggregated and spread over a long period, to provide the affordability for these assets and programs to be acquired by MoD. Perhaps, some of the GLCs could be mobilised to provide some of the financial commitment for these programs to materialise.

After all, it is for national service and defence of the realm.

On top of that, an experienced corporate man should be able to restructure and make the armed forces more effective with its current complement and strength, where all resources are optimised.

That is the rational why an experience corporate man should be appointed as the next Minister of Defence.

Published in: on June 25, 2015 at 14:30  Comments (12)  

Lessons from Paracels XXI: Bald eagle challenging the protogonistic panda

China encroaching into neighbours EEZ territories as defined by UNCLOS (1982) and relationship is sliding downwards

China encroaching into neighbours EEZ territories as defined by UNCLOS (1982) and relationship is sliding downwards, with the ‘Nine-Dash-Line’ unsubstantiated claims

United States is considering to deploy the US Navy around the disputed are of multiple claims in South China Sea, as a projection of force in an international waters which China claimed to be part of ‘Nine-Dash-Line’.

CNN.com story:

China cautions U.S. Navy on patrols in South China Sea

By Brad Lendon and Jim Sciutto, CNN
Updated 0106 GMT (0806 HKT) May 14, 2015

Source: CNN

150511-N-VO234-286 SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 11, 2015) The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) conducts patrols in international waters of the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands as the People’s Liberation Army-Navy [PLA(N)] guided-missile frigate Yancheng (FFG 546) transits close behind. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Conor Minto/Released)
U.S. considering surveillance of South China Sea

150511-N-VO234-286 SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 11, 2015) The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) conducts patrols in international waters of the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands as the People’s Liberation Army-Navy [PLA(N)] guided-missile frigate Yancheng (FFG 546) transits close behind. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Conor Minto/Released)
U.S. considering surveillance of South China Sea

Story highlights
South China Sea is the subject of numerous rival territorial claims
U.S. considers deploying aircraft and ships to contest Chinese claims to disputed islands
China cautions U.S. it doesn’t have “free access” to China’s territorial waters
Washington (CNN)The U.S. is considering deploying aircraft and ships to contest Chinese claims to disputed islands in the South China Sea, U.S. officials said Wednesday.

Options are on the table to fly surveillance aircraft and sail Navy ships nearby in a move that puts the U.S. directly into a contentious territorial contest in East Asia, in which, until now, the U.S. has avoided overtly taking sides.

The South China Sea is the subject of numerous rival — often messy — territorial claims, with China, Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam disputing sovereignty of several island chains and nearby waters.

China on Wednesday cautioned the U.S. against taking any actions that might be considered provocative, according to a report from the state-run Xinhua news service.

While Beijing supports freedom of navigation in the South China Sea, the U.S. must be careful in how it uses that right, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said in the report.

“Freedom of navigation does not give one country’s military aircraft and ships free access to another country’s territorial waters and airspace,” Hua is quoted as saying in the Xinhua report.

A U.S. Navy statement Wednesday said the littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth arrived for resupply in the Philippines after completing a weeklong patrol in the South China Sea that took it near the disputed Spratly Islands.

The Navy said it was the first time an LCS, one of the newest vessels in the U.S. fleet, had operated in international waters near the islands. The Spratlys have been claimed in whole or in part by China, Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia, according to the U.S. State Department.

“As part of our strategic rebalance to bring our newest and most capable Navy platforms to the Indo-Asia-Pacific, (the LCSs have) a regular presence in Southeast Asia. Routine operations like the one Fort Worth just completed in the South China Sea will be the new normal as we welcome four LCSs to the region in the coming years,” Capt. Fred Kacher, commodore of the Navy’s Destroyer Squadron 7, said in the Navy release.

The Navy said the Fort Worth came across “multiple” Chinese warships during its patrol. A photo released by the Navy showed the Fort Worth being trailed by a Chinese guided-missile frigate, the Yancheng.

“Our interactions with Chinese ships continue to be professional,” the commander of the Fort Worth, Cmdr. Matt Kawas, said in the statement.

China building ‘Great Wall of Sand’ in South China Sea
China building ‘Great Wall of Sand’ in South China Sea 02:12
Kawas said his vessel followed the international Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea to “clarify intentions and prevent miscommunication” with the Chinese ships.

Tensions over the Spratlys have increased in recent months as China has built facilities on five reclaimed-land sites in the islands, including a 10,000-foot (3,050-meter) airstrip.

James Hardy, editor of Jane’s Asia Pacific, told CNN in February that China was executing “a methodical, well-planned campaign to create a chain of air and sea capable fortresses across the center of the Spratly Islands chain.”

The disputed areas in the islands include fertile fishing grounds and potentially rich reserves of undersea natural resources.


PLAN building a permanent airstrip and jetty in an atoll which was illegally occupied and contravened the UNCLOS

PLAN building a permanent airstrip and jetty in an atoll which was illegally occupied and contravened the UNCLOS

This projection of force by US Navy is one of the reaction welcome by some of the countries which is affected by China’s aggressive military maneurvres. China’s expansionary attitude and doctrine is well demonstrated by PLA Navy (PLAN) operations within the ‘Nine-Dash-Line’.

In March, China has been caught to been building permanent airstrips and jetties which suggest that this ‘occupied’ atolls would be used as a forward base for PLAN troops and assets.

Published in: on May 14, 2015 at 12:00  Comments (18)  

PM Najib: UNCLOS is the solution for ‘Nine-Dash-Line’

Chairman for ASEAN Summit 2015 Malaysian Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Mohd. Najib Tun Razak urges to quickly implement the Code of Conduct (based on Document of Conduct ASEAN inked which include China in Nov 2002 and UNCLOS 1982) to resolve the multiple claims of South China Sea or ‘Nine-Dash-Line’.

Channel News Asia story:

ASEAN needs to address China’s reclamation in disputed sea: Statement

By Melissa Goh, Malaysia Bureau Chief, Channel NewsAsia
POSTED: 28 Apr 2015 19:54

UPDATED: 28 Apr 2015 23:59 A day-late release of the concluding ASEAN summit statement by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak was stronger than expected on the South China Sea.

LANGKAWI: ASEAN needs to urgently address Beijing’s reclamation work in the South China Sea.

This was the key takeaway as Malaysia Prime Minister Najib Razak wrapped up a summit that focused on the issue as a potential threat to regional stability.

A day-late release of the concluding ASEAN summit statement by Prime Minister Najib Razak was stronger than expected on the South China Sea. It reflected concerns by the Philippines and Vietnam and was amended at the last minute and only released a day after the summit ended.

Analysts had expected the grouping to steer clear of comments about China, but Manila has warned that failure to call China to task over the reclamation work on islands it also claims would undermine ASEAN credibility and solidarity.

Najib denied that the issue has split the grouping. “I see there is strong ASEAN unity and solidarity, we may defer slightly in our approaches but we are all on the same page – the principles on how we deal with South China Sea.”

He said ASEAN would continue to engage China through non-confrontational means by adhering to international laws, in particular the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea.

ASEAN foreign ministers meanwhile are tasked to urgently address the issue and push for early conclusion of a code of conduct with China in the South China Sea.

But the Philippines still wants an international tribunal. “We are still pursuing our case for arbitration in a tribunal,” said Philippines Foreign Minister Alberto Rosario.

However, other member countries prefer a softer approach. “China is an important partner of ASEAN and ASEAN is an important partner for China. We will try to intensify our dialogue with China,” said Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi.

China is ASEAN’s largest trading partner. Two-way trade is targeted to reach US$1 trillion by 2020. Beijing in the past year has tried to improve ties with its ASEAN neighbours by unveiling plans for massive investment in Asian infrastructure.

ASEAN, Najib said, is supportive of China’s proposal to help build new overland and maritime trade routes between Asia and Europe under the one belt one road initiative.

– CNA/ec


We have had extensive and repetitive discussion here about the ‘Nine-Dash-Line’ and China’s attitude and aggressive approach towards the motive of expanding its control and territorial claims all over South China Sea.

We would to add a commentator’s take on the matter and brief history on the development of the unsubstantiated claims by China:

“Simply put, if the Chinese have their way, we will lose about a quarter of our territory! Yet not much has been really made known to public, as if we can simply sweep this under the proverbial carpet. In comparison, we are so concerned about a bunch of rag tag fighters taking over a small kampung named Tanduo in Lahad Datu.

Much had been said about Chinese claims over most of South China Sea and how it is according to them, “indisputable based on historical facts and maps”.

Check out the following link to The Philippine’s Institute of Maritime and Ocean Affairs.


They took the pain to researched and published all these maps going back to 1136 AD where a stone etched map from Fuchang, China made during the Song Dynasty. The map titled ‘Hua Yi Tu’ or ‘Map of China and the Barbarian Countries’ was published in the 1900s and is now in the Forest of Stone Steles Museum in Xi’an, China. (Yup – they call everybody else “barbarian”).

This and another 71 maps, including 15 maps from China itself consistently show Hainan Island as the southernmost territory of China. On the other hand the sometimes 10 dash line, sometime 11 dash line and more recently 9 dash line is only based on some Chinese idiot’s sketch in 1947. It is only officially lodged (vaguely and not in compliance with UNCLOS or international standard and norm) to the UN in 2009!!

The Chinese “Historical Facts” is just a Giant Historical Lies!! Yet they have no qualm pushing their way and pretending like they are in the right.”

Published in: on April 29, 2015 at 12:47  Comments (8)  

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